Star Ocean: Integrity and Faithlessness

Star Ocean 5: Integrity and Faithlessness ★ FULL MOVIE / ALL CUTSCENES 【1080p HD】
Star Ocean 5: Integrity and Faithlessness ★ FULL MOVIE / ALL CUTSCENES 【1080p HD】

Star Ocean: Integrity and Faithlessness

Star Ocean:

Integrity and Faithlessness

Developer(s) tri-Ace
Publisher(s) Square-Enix
Director(s) Hiroshi Ogawa
Producer(s) Shuichi Kobayashi
Designer(s) Akira Yasuda
Programmer(s) Yoshiharu Gotanda
Artist(s) Akira Yasuda
Writer(s) Yoshiharu Gotanda Mitsuhiro Nakazawa
Composer(s) Motoi Sakuraba
Series Star Ocean
Platform(s)
Release PlayStation 4
Genre(s) Action role-playing
Mode(s) Single-player

Star Ocean: Integrity and Faithlessness[a] is an action role-playing video game developed by tri-Ace and published by Square Enix for the PlayStation 4 and PlayStation 3.[3] It is the fifth major installment in the Star Ocean series, following Star Ocean: The Last Hope.

Gameplay[edit]

The battle system is similar to other games in the Star Ocean series, with the player controlling one of seven party members in battles, with the ability to switch control of characters.[3] The real-time action battle system features improved game mechanics. The storytelling cutscenes are intended to be interactive and dynamic, and seamlessly transition with the gameplay.[4][5] Features from previous Star Ocean games such the ability to create items are also present.[6] Enemies are programmed to have a “very complex” AI, with players able to custom configure enemy intelligence to a degree.[6] The game uses “private actions” system of previous series titles, where the story tracks which party members interact during the story to adjust the story’s direction.[7]

Story[edit]

Star Ocean: Integrity and Faithlessness takes place in S.D 537 (A.D 2623), between Star Ocean: The Second Story and Star Ocean: Till the End of Time,[8] the second and third games in the main Star Ocean series. It is set on the planet Faykreed, 6,000 light years from Earth.[9]

The story begins with a protagonist living on an “undeveloped” planet that is thrown into chaos by first contact with a more advanced space traveling race.[7] Characters include Fidel Camuze, voiced by Max Mittelman in English[10] and Kaito Ishikawa in Japanese,[11] who is the protagonist of the game and a fencer who protects his home village; Miki Sauvester, voiced by Eden Riegel in English[10] and Nao Toyama in Japanese,[11] who is the heroine of the game and Fidel’s childhood friend; and Relia, an emotionless and amnesiac girl.[3] The story will feature multiple endings depending upon user choices.[7]

Development[edit]

Star Ocean: Integrity and Faithlessness was first announced to be under development on April 14, 2015, in an issue of Famitsu.[3] The developer was announced as tri-Ace, who has developed all of the other main titles in the series, and the publisher as Square Enix. The game was produced by Shuichi Kobayashi and directed by Hiroshi Ogawa. The characters are being designed by Akira Yasuda.[12]

After Star Ocean: The Last Hope, many at Square Enix thought the series was over, due to the games producer Yoshinori Yamagishi being done with the franchise.[13] Because of this, Kobayashi took it upon himself to work on a sequel proposal in secret with the series creator Yoshiharu Gotanda.[13] Kobayashi forced himself to take on the project and worked on the proposal until it was ready, since he feared that a rejection of a sequel would mean the end of the franchise.[13] Kobayashi also wanted to relaunch Star Ocean because he was concerned that the shrinking console market and the continued push by Square Enix and other developers to make simpler games to launch on mobile platforms would make further sequels impossible for less famous franchises.[14]

Kobayashi stated in an interview that he wanted the game to draw its “essence” from Star Ocean: Till the End of Time.[3][12] The logo is also intended to be reminiscent of the logo for Star Ocean 3 and the project as a whole is meant to reassure fans that the developers are still committed to the series.

The game was developed primarily for the PlayStation 3, with the PlayStation 4 version as a port.[3] The PlayStation 3 version of the game was not released outside Japan due to the very small PlayStation 3 market remaining outside Japan.[15] As to why the game was being developed for PlayStation 3 and PlayStation 4, Kobayashi stated that the focus was on getting the game to fans of the original games, and that meant delivering the game to those consoles.[16] Technical differences exist between the two different console versions, with the PlayStation 4 achieving higher framerates and resolution than the PlayStation 3 version.[17] The PlayStation 3 release was moved back from the original launch date by several weeks to give more time for optimization for the game systems hardware.[2]

Also in consideration of the series’ aging fanbase, the protagonist Fidel was made to be 23 years old instead of a teenager to be more relatable to the games audience.[18] Kobayashi said that downloadable content was a possibility, but traditional console players would prefer more work on the game or its sequel instead.[16] The game producers altered the character Miki’s clothes (which in this case was her underwear) to make her outfit more conservative in anticipation of backlash from western audiences against teenagers in sexually provocative clothing.[19] Other localization adjustments were made during the quality assurance testing included a moment where Miki meets Relia, a younger girl, and reassures her by patting her on the head; this gesture, however, did not register positively internationally and was modified.[14]

A large focus of the game was on making it “seamless”, such as smooth transitions between gameplay and combat, eliminating random encounters with enemies, as well as perfecting the angling of the in-game camera to automatically go to the best spot for players to see their enemies during combat.[12][16] The development team was guided by the principle that gameplay should not be interrupted unless it is necessary.[12] Also part of the seamlessness was the reduction in cut scenes to keep the narrative more cohesive and focused on the gameplay experience.[12]

When asked about the possibility of a Microsoft Windows version of the game, producer Shuichi Kobayashi explained porting the game would likely be easy due to the ASKA engine tri-Ace used to develop the game but that they were having difficulty trying to find a way for players without a controller to play the game. Due to this they decided to delay a possible PC release.[20]

Reception[edit]

Aggregator Score
Metacritic 58/100[21]
Publication Score
Destructoid 6/10[22]
Famitsu 34/40[28]
Game Informer 5/10[23]
GameSpot 5/10[24]
GamesRadar+



IGN 5.8/10[26]
Polygon 5/10[27]

Star Ocean: Integrity and Faithlessness received “mixed or average” reviews, according to video game review aggregator Metacritic.[21] IGN notes that the graphics varied widely in quality, from very high quality to Minecraft and noting there were no cutscenes, so the acting had less emotional impact.[26] They did, however praise the game’s score and cast of characters.[26] Destructoid also missed having cutscenes due to character dialogue being unskippable and the adjustable cameras sometimes missing the characters facial reactions.[22] Combat was praised as being smooth and manageable even when the players party grows to seven characters.[22] Game Informer stated that the characters were cliche and underdeveloped, with long dialogue sequences looking at “nothing except the backs of your party members’ heads.”[23] Further addressing the dialogue, GameSpot decried its poor quality and lack of clear reasons why the protagonists decide to join forces.[24] They also noted how the same enemies reappear in the same locations, making travel across the large game world difficult.[24] Games Radar praised the fast-paced arcade like combat and a likable cast, but noted the seeming low production values, leading to dialogue filling in for seeing events like space battles and taking away the expected excitement.[25] And while they complimented the combat system, they noted that the players characters have no spatial awareness which hinders players strategizing.[25] Polygon stated that the most frustrating part of the game is believing there will be extensive sections of the game and story occurring in space, but then finding that is not the case.[27]

Sales[edit]

The PlayStation 4 and PlayStation 3 versions of Star Ocean: Integrity and Faithlessness sold a combined 175,000 copies in Japan as of September 2016.[29]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Known in Japan as Star Ocean 5: Integrity and Faithlessness (スターオーシャン5 Integrity and Faithlessness, Sutā Ōshan Faibu Integuriti ando Feisuresunesu)

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Porter, Matt (April 4, 2016). “Star Ocean: Integrity and Faithlessness Release Date Announced”. IGN. Archived from the original on April 7, 2016. Retrieved April 4, 2016.
  2. ^ a b c Romano, Sal (March 7, 2016). “Star Ocean 5 for PS3 delayed to April 28 in Japan”. Gematsu. Retrieved March 9, 2016.
  3. ^ a b c d e f Romano, Sal (2015-04-14). “Star Ocean 5 announced for PS4, PS3”. Gematsu. Archived from the original on 2015-04-14. Retrieved 2015-04-14.
  4. ^ “STAR OCEAN: Integrity and Faithlessness Announced For The Americas” (Press release). Square Enix. Archived from the original on 2015-11-19.
  5. ^ Neil Herndon (2015-06-16). “Square Enix Looks To Change Sandbox Games”. Forbes Magazine. Retrieved 2016-04-05.
  6. ^ a b Sal Romano (2015-06-19). “Star Ocean 5 producer: “there was something not really right” about Star Ocean 4″. Gematsu. Archived from the original on 2016-04-07. Retrieved 2016-04-08.
  7. ^ a b c Philip Kollar (2015-06-25). “Square Enix’s plan to save Star Ocean”. Polygon. Retrieved 2016-04-05.
  8. ^ Ashcraft, Brian (2015-04-14). “First Look at Star Ocean 5”. Kotaku. Retrieved 2015-04-14.
  9. ^ Sato (2015-04-14). “Star Ocean 5 Details On Main Characters And Battle System”. Siliconera. Archived from the original on 2015-04-15. Retrieved 2015-04-14.
  10. ^ a b “Star Ocean: Integrity and Faithlessness (2016 Video Game)”. Behind The Voice Actors. Retrieved 25 May 2020. A green check mark indicates that a role has been confirmed using a screenshot (or collage of screenshots) of the title’s list of voice actors and their respective characters found in its closing credits and/or other reliable sources of information.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: postscript (link)
  11. ^ a b “Star Ocean: Integrity and Faithlessness (2016 Video Game) Japanese Cast”. Behind The Voice Actors. Retrieved 25 May 2020. A green check mark indicates that a role has been confirmed using a screenshot (or collage of screenshots) of the title’s list of voice actors and their respective characters found in its closing credits and/or other reliable sources of information.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: postscript (link)
  12. ^ a b c d e Shuichi Kobayashi (2015-06-17). “E3 2015: STAR OCEAN: Integrity and Faithlessness”. Square Enix. Retrieved 2016-04-09.
  13. ^ a b c Kyle McGregor (2015-06-16). “Star Ocean 4 was nearly the end of the franchise”. Destructoid. Archived from the original on 2016-03-29. Retrieved 2016-04-04.
  14. ^ a b Alexa Ray Corriea (2016-04-08). “Star Ocean 5’s Producer on Localization Challenges and the Future of Console JRPGs”. GameSpot. Archived from the original on 2016-04-11. Retrieved 2016-04-08.
  15. ^ Khan, Zarmena (2015-07-24). “Star Ocean 5 Isn’t Coming to PS3 in the West Because Last-Gen Market Has “Diminished to Nothing””. PlayStation Lifestyle. Archived from the original on 2015-07-02. Retrieved 2015-07-24.
  16. ^ a b c Sato (2015-04-21). “Star Ocean 5 Is Being Made For Fans Of Older Star Ocean Games”. Siliconera. Retrieved 2016-04-07.
  17. ^ Sal Romano (2016-02-29). “Star Ocean 5 PS4 and PS3 differences outlined”. Gematsu. Archived from the original on 2016-04-10. Retrieved 2016-04-08.
  18. ^ Sal Romano (2015-04-17). “Star Ocean 5 first details, Famitsu screenshots”. Gematsu. Archived from the original on 2016-03-13. Retrieved 2016-04-07.
  19. ^ Mike Cosimano (2016-03-29). “Star Ocean devs alter costume in anticipation of ‘western criticism'”. Destructoid. Archived from the original on 2016-04-02. Retrieved 2016-04-07.
  20. ^ “Star Ocean 5 : Interview de Shuichi Kobayashi”. FFDream.com. May 16, 2016. Archived from the original on November 23, 2017.
  21. ^ a b “Star Ocean: Integrity and Faithlessness for PlayStation 4 Reviews”. Metacritic. Archived from the original on June 30, 2016. Retrieved June 28, 2016.
  22. ^ a b c Carter, Chris (June 28, 2016). “Review: Star Ocean: Integrity and Faithlessness”. Destructoid. Archived from the original on June 28, 2016. Retrieved June 28, 2016.
  23. ^ a b Wallace, Kimberley (June 27, 2016). “Drowning In Bad Decisions – Star Ocean: Integrity and Faithlessness – PlayStation 4”. Game Informer. Archived from the original on July 1, 2016. Retrieved June 27, 2016.
  24. ^ a b c Ray Corriea, Alexa (June 27, 2016). “Star Ocean: Integrity and Faithlessness Review”. GameSpot. Archived from the original on June 29, 2016. Retrieved June 27, 2016.
  25. ^ a b c Roberts, David (June 27, 2016). “Star Ocean: Integrity and Faithlessness review”. GamesRadar. Archived from the original on June 29, 2016. Retrieved June 27, 2016.
  26. ^ a b c Johnson, Leif (June 28, 2016). “Star Ocean: Integrity and Faithlessness Review”. IGN. Retrieved June 28, 2016.
  27. ^ a b Kollar, Philip (June 28, 2016). “Star Ocean: Integrity and Faithlessness review”. Polygon. Archived from the original on June 28, 2016. Retrieved June 28, 2016.
  28. ^ Romano, Sal (2016-03-22). “Famitsu Review Scores: Issue 1425”. Archived from the original on 2016-04-01. Retrieved 2016-04-07.
  29. ^ “2016年テレビゲームソフト売り上げTOP1000”. Famitsu (in Japanese). Geimin. Archived from the original on 2016-09-05. Retrieved 2016-09-21.

External links[edit]

  • 2016 video games
  • Action role-playing video games
  • PlayStation 3 games
  • PlayStation 4 games
  • Single-player video games
  • Space opera video games
  • Square Enix games
  • Star Ocean
  • Tri-Ace
  • Video games scored by Motoi Sakuraba
  • Video games set on fictional planets
  • Video games set in the 27th century
  • Video games developed in Japan

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