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STAR OCEAN: Integrity and Faithlessness Story Trailer | PS4
STAR OCEAN: Integrity and Faithlessness Story Trailer | PS4

Overall, I would say that this game is good but not excellent by comparison to the standards of other JRPGs.. The game revisits several elements of Star Oceans of the past and does so quite well. The combat system is very reminiscent of previous installments of the franchise and offers a few new exciting elements including a massive seven party team that is active in every battle. Characters are highly customizable through the use of skills that can be leveled. This adds quite a bit of depth to combat as well as party development. Item creation is back too and fun to manipulate (especially if the player is aware that there are a few select recipes early on that can be used to give the party a decisive advantage for a good portion of the game’s main story). I would also praise the game’s graphics, story, and music as being quite good too which is a typical feature of Square-Enix JRPGs.
I feel that this game loses out in a couple areas, though. The world at times can feel quite small especially given that, for the most part, sidequests involve frequently revisiting previous areas. This feature can make the world feel small and redundant at times. The combat system, as well, might feel awkward to fans of traditional RPGs since it is very action heavy with very few turn-based elements.
A couple of other redeemable features include the fact that the game has multiple difficulty levels as well as endings that can be manipulated through the “Private Actions” feature of the game. Overall, I would consider this game quite good and would recommend it to any fan of JRPGs that may be looking for something new to play. I would also recommend the official guide to go along with this game since it is rather complex with several elements that a player might not be able to figure out on their own.

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Star Ocean: Integrity and Faithlessness – PlayStation 4

Platform : PlayStation 4

Rated: Teen

-9% $35.95

Typical price: $39.50

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Reviewed in the United States on July 10, 2023

It’s an okay game I like it

Reviewed in the United States on September 11, 2017

Well, I think I can safely say that Tri-Ace should pack it up after this title. While Star Ocean: Integrity and Faithlessness doesn’t really do anything wrong, it’s a pretty dull and lackluster RPG. Compared against “western” RPGs, Star Ocean feels much like a tricycle in a Formula One race. Even compared against the lackluster JRPGs of today, Star Ocean is pretty pedestrian.
What the heck happened? No one would deny that the series has had ups and downs, but Star Ocean games were once quite cutting-edge in the realm of the JRPG. Star Ocean: The Second Story might have been the very first JRPG I played where in-game choices affected endings received, and different party members were taken based on in-game choices. Star Ocean: Till The End of Time introduced the idea of Battle Trophies, small in-game accomplishments that would unlock certain extras like outfits, music modes, and even higher difficulties. They even had screen shots, on PS2! Star Ocean: The Last Hope added on a robust quest system that, even today, Final Fantasy can’t seem to figure out, and expanded the Battle Trophy idea beyond all reasonable common sense (as anyone who got all 900(!) of those trophies can attest). But Star Ocean: Integrity and Faithlessness? It adds nothing of real note.
There are two major conclusions that can be drawn from this game. The first is that the assets for this game look like they were cannibalized from other projects. The combat and role system seems like an abandoned MMO idea. The music is taken from multiple previous Star Oceans (but honestly, could they not have re-recorded some of the excellent tracks from the Second Story). And this leads to the second conclusion: Tri-Ace worked on a shoestring budget, attempting their best effort at making a silk purse from a sow’s ear. And to be honest, they almost certainly made the best game they could, given these deficiencies. Unfortunately, that game isn’t particularly good.
First, the pros. The environments look nice, and the characters look great. The girl with the checkerboard dress is probably one of my favorite character models in a JRPG ever. The quest system is solid, with a variety of quests that make use of hunting for items, synthesizing, and monster slaying. Battle trophies have been simplified, and are very workable. The equippable “roles”, adding attack bonuses and other goodies to your character, add a tactical flair to the game that was missing in The Last Hope. And, best of all, the “Private Action” system is probably the most convenient ever, even going so far as to tell you how many PAs are available at a given time.
Unfortunately, each of these pros is canceled by a corresponding con. The story is haphazard. The game introduces characters the way a salesperson might show you different car models. At the beginning of the game, one character (Miki) is introduced as follows: “Hey, there’s Miki! Isn’t she 18 now? I still think of her as my little sister.” Apparently, I am meant to glean all relevant information about the relationship from those three lines. And mind you – I’m not skipping through anything. You might think that PAs pick up the slack. You’d be very wrong. Most PAs are little more than voyeuristic looks into the CURRENT relationships between party members, Some of them are, quite literally, nothing. Near the beginning of the game, I had three separate PAs with a character, where she looked for a cat. All of them were one line.
Combat is a hassle. Star Ocean has taken the route by which there is no transition from overworld travel to combat (sort of). You see enemies on the map, you charge in and fight them. If you hit a button before they see you, you get a bonus to attack. If they hit you before you hit the button, you get a penalty to attack. The rest of the battle amounts to frenetically running around, swinging your sword until one side is dead. On the lower difficulties, your side always wins (unless you get caught in a Cathedral of Oblivion, which I’ll explain later). On higher difficulties, this changes, but not so much (certainly, not as much as, say, Till the End of Time). Combat brings the usual rewards of experience, money and items. And experience is pretty much given out like candy, as far as I can see.
There are overworld gates to dungeons called “Cathedrals of Oblivion” (at least, I think that’s the name). When you enter, you get a helpful tutorial alerting you to the fact that you better be prepared for a challenge. That’s all fine and good…except for the fact that, given that I haven’t faced a single enemy there, I have no idea just how challenging it should be. For example, I entered such a game early in the game. As it turned out, that challenge was beyond me, and I got crushed. But how was I supposed to know that I would get crushed before I even took up the challenge? You can’t leave the Cathedral once you start fighting enemies, after all.
The story is absurdly dull. Star Ocean stories have always been pretty peanut butter sci-fi, but at least they asked interesting questions. In Till The End of Time, our characters actually meet their creators (and are disappointed in the result). In The Last Hope, our characters learn that forcing evolution upon species unprepared for the newfound power can have catastrophic repercussions. In Integrity and Faithlessness we…follow a little girl with amnesia. To be fair, there is some more depth, but it takes so long to get there that you probably won’t care. Tri-Ace has always been bad about glacial development (in Till the End of Time, you spend about half the game on a planet trapped in the middle ages), but this one might take the cake (well, except for Resonance of Fate, but that’s a whole ‘nuther story). On the plus side, cut scenes move (relatively) fast, and the game progresses quickly. Unfortunately, when the destination is ho-hum, it really doesn’t matter how fast you get there, right?
And speaking of the whole medieval thing – can we give it a rest? Is it so hard to have pew pew laser guns as the default weapon? I mean, it’s hard for me to think that I’m travelling the universe when every planet I see has people fighting with swords and shields.
I’m being pretty negative, but in all honesty, Star Ocean isn’t a bad title. It’s just a very mediocre one, from a company that used to push the envelope. If you like JRPGs, you might like this. If you don’t, I can pretty much guarantee that you won’t.
Pack it up, Tri-Ace – like many of your Japanese associates, your time has passed.

What the heck happened? No one would deny that the series has had ups and downs, but Star Ocean games were once quite cutting-edge in the realm of the JRPG. Star Ocean: The Second Story might have been the very first JRPG I played where in-game choices affected endings received, and different party members were taken based on in-game choices. Star Ocean: Till The End of Time introduced the idea of Battle Trophies, small in-game accomplishments that would unlock certain extras like outfits, music modes, and even higher difficulties. They even had screen shots, on PS2! Star Ocean: The Last Hope added on a robust quest system that, even today, Final Fantasy can’t seem to figure out, and expanded the Battle Trophy idea beyond all reasonable common sense (as anyone who got all 900(!) of those trophies can attest). But Star Ocean: Integrity and Faithlessness? It adds nothing of real note.

There are two major conclusions that can be drawn from this game. The first is that the assets for this game look like they were cannibalized from other projects. The combat and role system seems like an abandoned MMO idea. The music is taken from multiple previous Star Oceans (but honestly, could they not have re-recorded some of the excellent tracks from the Second Story). And this leads to the second conclusion: Tri-Ace worked on a shoestring budget, attempting their best effort at making a silk purse from a sow’s ear. And to be honest, they almost certainly made the best game they could, given these deficiencies. Unfortunately, that game isn’t particularly good.

First, the pros. The environments look nice, and the characters look great. The girl with the checkerboard dress is probably one of my favorite character models in a JRPG ever. The quest system is solid, with a variety of quests that make use of hunting for items, synthesizing, and monster slaying. Battle trophies have been simplified, and are very workable. The equippable “roles”, adding attack bonuses and other goodies to your character, add a tactical flair to the game that was missing in The Last Hope. And, best of all, the “Private Action” system is probably the most convenient ever, even going so far as to tell you how many PAs are available at a given time.

Unfortunately, each of these pros is canceled by a corresponding con. The story is haphazard. The game introduces characters the way a salesperson might show you different car models. At the beginning of the game, one character (Miki) is introduced as follows: “Hey, there’s Miki! Isn’t she 18 now? I still think of her as my little sister.” Apparently, I am meant to glean all relevant information about the relationship from those three lines. And mind you – I’m not skipping through anything. You might think that PAs pick up the slack. You’d be very wrong. Most PAs are little more than voyeuristic looks into the CURRENT relationships between party members, Some of them are, quite literally, nothing. Near the beginning of the game, I had three separate PAs with a character, where she looked for a cat. All of them were one line.

Combat is a hassle. Star Ocean has taken the route by which there is no transition from overworld travel to combat (sort of). You see enemies on the map, you charge in and fight them. If you hit a button before they see you, you get a bonus to attack. If they hit you before you hit the button, you get a penalty to attack. The rest of the battle amounts to frenetically running around, swinging your sword until one side is dead. On the lower difficulties, your side always wins (unless you get caught in a Cathedral of Oblivion, which I’ll explain later). On higher difficulties, this changes, but not so much (certainly, not as much as, say, Till the End of Time). Combat brings the usual rewards of experience, money and items. And experience is pretty much given out like candy, as far as I can see.

There are overworld gates to dungeons called “Cathedrals of Oblivion” (at least, I think that’s the name). When you enter, you get a helpful tutorial alerting you to the fact that you better be prepared for a challenge. That’s all fine and good…except for the fact that, given that I haven’t faced a single enemy there, I have no idea just how challenging it should be. For example, I entered such a game early in the game. As it turned out, that challenge was beyond me, and I got crushed. But how was I supposed to know that I would get crushed before I even took up the challenge? You can’t leave the Cathedral once you start fighting enemies, after all.

The story is absurdly dull. Star Ocean stories have always been pretty peanut butter sci-fi, but at least they asked interesting questions. In Till The End of Time, our characters actually meet their creators (and are disappointed in the result). In The Last Hope, our characters learn that forcing evolution upon species unprepared for the newfound power can have catastrophic repercussions. In Integrity and Faithlessness we…follow a little girl with amnesia. To be fair, there is some more depth, but it takes so long to get there that you probably won’t care. Tri-Ace has always been bad about glacial development (in Till the End of Time, you spend about half the game on a planet trapped in the middle ages), but this one might take the cake (well, except for Resonance of Fate, but that’s a whole ‘nuther story). On the plus side, cut scenes move (relatively) fast, and the game progresses quickly. Unfortunately, when the destination is ho-hum, it really doesn’t matter how fast you get there, right?

And speaking of the whole medieval thing – can we give it a rest? Is it so hard to have pew pew laser guns as the default weapon? I mean, it’s hard for me to think that I’m travelling the universe when every planet I see has people fighting with swords and shields.

I’m being pretty negative, but in all honesty, Star Ocean isn’t a bad title. It’s just a very mediocre one, from a company that used to push the envelope. If you like JRPGs, you might like this. If you don’t, I can pretty much guarantee that you won’t.

Pack it up, Tri-Ace – like many of your Japanese associates, your time has passed.

2 people found this helpful

Top reviews from other countries

riggivannia

Lo que esperaba… desafortunadamente .

Reviewed in Mexico on June 15, 2017

Pues …lo encontré barato … solo así , buenos gráficos, combate masheable, la cámara es muy mala sigue rígidamente al personaje por lo que si, digamos qué hay una pequeña piedra en el camino que eleva ligeramente al personaje la cámara se mueve exactamente lo mismo que el personaje sin suavizar su movimiento ni nada. pareciera que no es problema pero es sumamente molesto y no ayuda a enfocar nada. Con tanto rpg puedes invertir mejor tu tiempo en otro. Pero si no quieres un rpg de 60 hrs este es más corto… la mitad o menos (25hrs aprox) y ya que el combate es masheable pues no tienes que pensar si llegas muy cansado del trabajo está agusto para apagar el cerebro un rato.

5 people found this helpful

Manuel García

Buena historia

Reviewed in Mexico on November 16, 2017

Este juego es recomendable para todo amante de los JRPG, pero mas que nada para los fans de la saga, ya que las animación y el gameplay no estan trabajados adecuadamente, y se entiende por los recursos con los que contó el desarrollo del juego. Si te gusta star ocean, este juego es necesario para continuar sabiendo mas de su universo.

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Manuel García

Reviewed in Mexico on November 16, 2017

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Michel Gómez

Buen juego

Reviewed in Mexico on January 8, 2020

El juego esta muy bueno, no decepciona a los seguidores de la saga, y a los que gustan de lo JRPG de igual manera es muy recomendable.
el envió muy satisfactorio a pesar de ser de importación

el envió muy satisfactorio a pesar de ser de importación

Amazon Customer

Great

Reviewed in Canada on July 18, 2018

I don’t know y all the bad reviews from what I have played so so far it great j rpg

One person found this helpful

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